Duan Research Group

Hetero-integrated Nanostructures and Nanodevices

FrontSlideshow

Using two-dimensional layered materials and their heterostructures, we are pushing the electronic and photonic devices towards the ultimate limit of single atomic layer, creating a new generation of devices with unprecedented performance, unique functions and/or extraordinary flexibility.
Combining chemical synthesis and physical assembly approaches, we are developing powerful strategies for the hetero-integration of multi-composition, multi-structure and multi-function at the nanoscale, and by doing so, creating a new generation of integrated materials and nanosystems with unprecedented performance or unique functions to break the boundaries of traditional technologies.
Using two-dimensional layered materials and their heterostructures, we are pushing the electronic and photonic devices towards the ultimate limit of single atomic layer, creating a new generation of devices with unprecedented performance, unique functions and/or extraordinary flexibility.
Through rational design and nanoscale eintegration of highly distinct materials and functions (e.g., light harvesting, charge transport, or catalytic capabilities), we are creating new material systems for highly efficient energy harvesting, conversion and storage.
With comparable size to functional biological building blocks, nanoscale systems are ideally suited for interfacing with biological systems. We are designing nanoscale electrical and optical systems that can greatly expand our capability in probing, imaging, monitoring, and manipulating biological processes with unprecedented resolution, sensitivity and precision.
Through rational design and nanoscale eintegration of highly distinct materials and functions (e.g., light harvesting, charge transport, or catalytic capabilities), we are creating new material systems for highly efficient energy harvesting, conversion and storage.
With comparable size to functional biological building blocks, nanoscale systems are ideally suited for interfacing with biological systems. We are designing nanoscale electrical and optical systems that can greatly expand our capability in probing, imaging, monitoring, and manipulating biological processes with unprecedented resolution, sensitivity and precision.
Combining chemical synthesis and physical assembly approaches, we are developing powerful strategies for the hetero-integration of multi-composition, multi-structure and multi-function at the nanoscale, and by doing so, creating a new generation of integrated materials and nanosystems with unprecedented performance or unique functions to break the boundaries of traditional technologies.

Welcome to the Duan Lab webpage!

Using two-dimensional layered materials and their heterostructures, we are pushing the electronic and photonic devices towards the ultimate limit of single atomic layer, creating a new generation of devices with unprecedented performance, unique functions and/or extraordinary flexibility.
Combining chemical synthesis and physical assembly approaches, we are developing powerful strategies for the hetero-integration of multi-composition, multi-structure and multi-function at the nanoscale, and by doing so, creating a new generation of integrated materials and nanosystems with unprecedented performance or unique functions to break the boundaries of traditional technologies.
Using two-dimensional layered materials and their heterostructures, we are pushing the electronic and photonic devices towards the ultimate limit of single atomic layer, creating a new generation of devices with unprecedented performance, unique functions and/or extraordinary flexibility.
Through rational design and nanoscale eintegration of highly distinct materials and functions (e.g., light harvesting, charge transport, or catalytic capabilities), we are creating new material systems for highly efficient energy harvesting, conversion and storage.
With comparable size to functional biological building blocks, nanoscale systems are ideally suited for interfacing with biological systems. We are designing nanoscale electrical and optical systems that can greatly expand our capability in probing, imaging, monitoring, and manipulating biological processes with unprecedented resolution, sensitivity and precision.
Through rational design and nanoscale eintegration of highly distinct materials and functions (e.g., light harvesting, charge transport, or catalytic capabilities), we are creating new material systems for highly efficient energy harvesting, conversion and storage.
With comparable size to functional biological building blocks, nanoscale systems are ideally suited for interfacing with biological systems. We are designing nanoscale electrical and optical systems that can greatly expand our capability in probing, imaging, monitoring, and manipulating biological processes with unprecedented resolution, sensitivity and precision.
Combining chemical synthesis and physical assembly approaches, we are developing powerful strategies for the hetero-integration of multi-composition, multi-structure and multi-function at the nanoscale, and by doing so, creating a new generation of integrated materials and nanosystems with unprecedented performance or unique functions to break the boundaries of traditional technologies.

News:

  • Four UCLA Chemistry & Biochemistry faculty have been named on the annual Highly Cited Researchers™ 2020 list from Clarivate, placing them among world’s most influential scholars, based on citations.

  • A team of UCLA, Caltech and Ford Motor Company researchers has improved fuel-cell technologies to exceed the U.S. Department of Energy targets in efficiency, stability and power. No other reported fuel cells have reached all these milestones simultaneously.

  • Researchers at University of California, Los Angeles, have recently devised an approach that could enable the development of programmable devices made of 2-D semiconductors. This approach, presented in the paper published in Nature Electronics, leverages a superionic phase transition in silver iodide to tailor the carrier type within devices made of WSe2 via a process called switchable ionic doping.

  • A new electrode material could make it possible to construct lithium-ion batteries with a high charging rate and storage capacity. If scaled up, the anode material developed by researchers at the University of Science and Technology of China (USTC) and colleagues in the US might be used to manufacture batteries with an energy density of more than 350 watt-hours per kilogram – enough for a typical electric vehicle (EV) to travel 600 miles on a single charge.

  • Four UCLA Chemistry & Biochemistry faculty are among the most influential scientists in their fields for 2019, as determined by Clarivate Analytics.

    Those recognized are Professors Xiangfeng Duan, Richard Kaner, Kendall Houk, and Jeffrey Zink.   

UCLA, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry
607 Charles E. Young Drive East, Box 951569
Los Angeles, CA 90095-1569
E-mail: xduan@chem.ucla.edu