Duan Research Group

Hetero-integrated Nanostructures and Nanodevices

Welcome to the Duan Lab webpage!

Heterogeneous Integration at the Atomic Scale

Combining chemical synthesis and physical assembly approaches, we are developing powerful strategies for the hetero-integration of multi-composition, multi-structure and multi-function at the nanoscale, and by doing so, creating a new generation of integrated materials and nanosystems with unprecedented performance or unique functions to break the boundaries of traditional technologies.

Heterogeneous Integration at the Atomic Scale

Combining chemical synthesis and physical assembly approaches, we are developing powerful strategies for the hetero-integration of multi-composition, multi-structure and multi-function at the nanoscale, and by doing so, creating a new generation of integrated materials and nanosystems with unprecedented performance or unique functions to break the boundaries of traditional technologies.

Atomically Thin Electronics and Photonics

Using two-dimensional layered materials and their heterostructures, we are pushing the electronic and photonic devices towards the ultimate limit of single atomic layer, creating a new generation of devices with unprecedented performance, unique functions and/or extraordinary flexibility.

Atomically Thin Electronics and Photonics

Using two-dimensional layered materials and their heterostructures, we are pushing the electronic and photonic devices towards the ultimate limit of single atomic layer, creating a new generation of devices with unprecedented performance, unique functions and/or extraordinary flexibility.

Energy Harvesting, Conversion and Storage

Through rational design and nanoscale eintegration of highly distinct materials and functions (e.g., light harvesting, charge transport, or catalytic capabilities), we are creating new material systems for highly efficient energy harvesting, conversion and storage.

Energy Harvesting, Conversion and Storage

Through rational design and nanoscale eintegration of highly distinct materials and functions (e.g., light harvesting, charge transport, or catalytic capabilities), we are creating new material systems for highly efficient energy harvesting, conversion and storage.

Biomedical Sensing and Therapeutics

With comparable size to functional biological building blocks, nanoscale systems are ideally suited for interfacing with biological systems. We are designing nanoscale electrical and optical systems that can greatly expand our capability in probing, imaging, monitoring, and manipulating biological processes with unprecedented resolution, sensitivity and precision.

Biomedical Sensing and Therapeutics

With comparable size to functional biological building blocks, nanoscale systems are ideally suited for interfacing with biological systems. We are designing nanoscale electrical and optical systems that can greatly expand our capability in probing, imaging, monitoring, and manipulating biological processes with unprecedented resolution, sensitivity and precision.

News:

  • Researchers have fabricated field effect transistors made from molybdenum sulfide that demonstrated the best performance to date in a transistor of this type. In the near future, their invention could mean vastly more powerful and sensitive fitness and health trackers, smartphones, computer-interface eyewear and other wearable applications. [via newsroom.ucla]

  • A new way to grow 2D-layered semiconductor heterostructures whose composition can be controlled by modulating the constituent vapour-phase reactants during growth has been developed, producing single crystals and might be used to make a host of electronics devices, ranging from complementary logic circuits, photovoltaics and photodetectors, to light-emitting diodes and laser diodes. [via nanotechweb.org]

  • Researchers at the California NanoSystems Institute (CNSI) at UCLA have set the stage for a watershed in mobile energy storage by using a special graphene material to significantly boost the energy density of electrochemical capacitors, putting them on a par with lead acid batteries. [via newsroom.ucla]

  • A pair of natural catalysts attached to graphene work in tandem to make nitroxyl, which could prevent blood clots from forming on medical implants [via acs.org]

  • In a recent news article in UCLA's campus news paper the Daily Bruin, Ashley Verhines documents Dr. Duan's accomplishments at UCLA. [via dailybruin.com]

UCLA, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry
607 Charles E. Young Drive East, Box 951569
Los Angeles, CA 90095-1569
E-mail: xduan@chem.ucla.edu